old pissed liBEARian

Jul 10

Letters to a Young Librarian: Square Pegs: On "Fit" in the Hiring Process -

calimae:

I love this post—Fit is such a huge deal when it comes to the day-to-day experience of working somewhere. I was very lucky in my first library position to find people I could work well with (it was a contracting job, so I had no contact with my future colleagues until I showed up my first day).

In looking for my second library position, I made it to the on-campus interview stage for an academic library job I really loved the sound of, it was in a good location for me in terms of distance to family, and everything seemed like it would be excellent… but by the end of the interview day, I felt almost claustrophobic and just wanted to get out of there. I simply didn’t ‘click’ with my potential colleagues, and now I consider it fortunate that I wasn’t offered the job because I don’t know what I would’ve done about that.

About a year later, I had the on-campus interview for what is now my job. The feel of that day was completely different and I felt completely at ease even though the interview day lasted longer than it had at that other campus (and I’m an introvert, so the fact that I felt almost comfortable despite the fact that I was interviewing and constantly around people I didn’t know was HUGE).

Jessica’s thoughts on how to evaluate potential fit are great, and her questions would’ve been great to have in the back of my mind as I interviewed. :)

I should also mention that fit was one of the reasons we didn’t end up hiring any of the people we interviewed last fall. Not the only reason by far, but for certain candidates that was a consideration in terms of how well they would have interacted with our various campus constituencies.

libralthinking:

The Mortality of Paper - Elizabeth Yale. http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/07/papers-mortality/373943/

libralthinking:

The Mortality of Paper - Elizabeth Yale. http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/07/papers-mortality/373943/

Here Comes the Panopticon: Insurance Companies -

futurescope:

jbmartin6 on slashdot:

The Panopticon may be coming, but perhaps not how we think. Instead of a massive government surveillance program, we might end up subjected to ubiquitous monitoring to save on our insurance premiums. The “internet of things (you can’t get away from)” makes this more and more possible

(via emergentfutures)

lotrlockedwhovian:

I WANT THIS AT WORK

lotrlockedwhovian:

I WANT THIS AT WORK

(Source: itscoffeeprincess, via wiseacrewhimsy)

[video]

[video]

Jul 08

Krebs on Security -

This guy was on Terry Gross on NPR today.  What a great source of up to date cyber security info.

Using Dogs to Detect the Scent of Ovarian Cancer - NBC News -

So, are we going to use the relatively cheap dog nose, or develop an artificial dog nose that will cost each hospital several million dollars?

pleatedjeans:

via

pleatedjeans:

via

(via unemployed-librarian)

Futurist Kurzweil Says He’s Building AI into Google Search | MIT Technology Review -

(Source: emergentfutures)

Why Linux is better -

Best thing I ever did was take the DVD and completely reformat my Win7 laptop.  I love Ubuntu and there’s no going back to Microsoft.

Jul 06

[video]

What are Prison Libraries Really Like? -

far-to-fall:

This was a fascinating read.

There are many things that are flat out wrong about the state of American prisons. Maybe censorship isn’t at the too of that list, but it made me want to pick up a pitchfork.

(Source: hq76o261984)

“A single-payer public health care option should be reexamined to detach employer whims from public needs. We must minimize the influence of bosses and businesses in the implementation of health care.” —

The Hobby Lobby Lesson: We Need To Fight For Single-Payer Health Care (via azspot)

I agree that single-payer is preferable, but coverage for birth control would become politicized anyway. Republican politicians would keep trying to strip out coverage either through amendments to budget bills or through executive orders once one of them won the presidency. The problem isn’t single-payer vs. exchange-based health care. It’s the existence of a significant constituency of misogynists and a Supreme Court willing to do their bidding.

(via dendroica)

Single-payer isn’t just preferable. It is just. Any arguments against it go against the fundamental right to the “pursuit of life.” It’s just morally the right thigh to do.

That being said, there are probably more politicians wanting to regulate women’s bodies than bosses. Such whims are nowhere near going away.

(via far-to-fall)

(via far-to-fall)

[video]