old pissed liBEARian

Aug 31

emergentfutures:

Software will eat the $1.2 trillion apparel industry

That’s why Apple has been shopping for executive talent at Burberry’s, TAG Heuer and Yves St. Laurent, says Horace Dediu.
Expanding on Mark Andreessen’s observation that “software is eating the world,” Asymco’s Horace Dediu took a close look Thursday at the industry he believes is next: Apparel.

Full Story: Fortune

emergentfutures:

Software will eat the $1.2 trillion apparel industry

That’s why Apple has been shopping for executive talent at Burberry’s, TAG Heuer and Yves St. Laurent, says Horace Dediu.

Expanding on Mark Andreessen’s observation that “software is eating the world,” Asymco’s Horace Dediu took a close look Thursday at the industry he believes is next: Apparel.

Full Story: Fortune

emergentfutures:

Here’s why Apple bought Beats: By 2019, streaming will account for 70 percent of digital music revenue

Here’s another reminder why companies like Apple and Amazon are betting on streaming services: Streaming is quickly taking over as the major money-maker for the music industry, with 70 percent of all digital music revenue coming from streaming by 2019, according to an estimate from U.K.-based digital music analyst Mark Mulligan.

Full Story: GigaOm

emergentfutures:

Here’s why Apple bought Beats: By 2019, streaming will account for 70 percent of digital music revenue

Here’s another reminder why companies like Apple and Amazon are betting on streaming services: Streaming is quickly taking over as the major money-maker for the music industry, with 70 percent of all digital music revenue coming from streaming by 2019, according to an estimate from U.K.-based digital music analyst Mark Mulligan.

Full Story: GigaOm

emergentfutures:

Amazon meets with FDA, shows signs of entering digital health sector

Full Story: Venture Beat

emergentfutures:

Amazon meets with FDA, shows signs of entering digital health sector

Full Story: Venture Beat

China Invents Cinema Hell -

parislemon:

Amy Qin on the latest cinema trend emerging in China:

The new “bullet screen,” or danmu, model of movie-watching that has recently been introduced in select theaters in China can perhaps be most pithily summed up with the title of the 2010 Chinese action comedy “Let the Bullets Fly.”

In this case, the bullets don’t refer to actual bullets, but to text messages that audience members send via their mobile phones while watching the film. The messages are then projected onto the screen, so that at any given time the scene may be overlaid with multiple “bullets,” or comments, scrolling across the screen.

Pop-Up Video. But in a theater. With content populated by the crowd. Of teens. What could go wrong?

"Hard to tell, really." -

parislemon:

Clay Shirky on the death of newspapers:

When the Tribune Company recently got rid of their newspapers, the New York Times ran the story under a headline “The Tribune Company’s publishing unit is being spun off, as the future of print remains unclear.”

The future of print remains what? Try to imagine a world where the future of print is unclear: Maybe 25 year olds will start demanding news from yesterday, delivered in an unshareable format once a day. Perhaps advertisers will decide “Click to buy” is for wimps. Mobile phones: could be a fad. After all, anything could happen with print. Hard to tell, really.

It is sort of humorous/sad how reluctant most publications are to call the most obvious of spades a spade. You’d think there was bias or something.

Aug 25

Okay, A

iworkatapubliclibrary:

Man: “Can you please tell me what movies you have checked in that start with the letter A?”

Me: “May I ask if you are looking for a particular title?”

Man: “Yes, American Graffiti.”

Me: “Is it okay with you if I just look up that particular movie?”

Man: “Sure, that’s a good idea!”

[social sandbox] visual stories, tools from Knight Lab, structured journalism -

socialmediadesk:

Hello everyone,

I was at NLGJA last week and sat in on a session about visual design. I thought I would pass along some of the interesting takeaways and links.

1. Here’s a list of visual stories that are unique in some way (curated by Gannett designer Tyler…

Millennial Boomtowns: Where The Generation Is Clustering (It's Not Downtown) -

Aug 13

byronegg:

Picture Imperfect
—-
Something for Teaching Tolerance magazine to accompany a story about how most children’s books and libraries lack a diverse perspective. AD Valerie Downes.

byronegg:

Picture Imperfect

—-

Something for Teaching Tolerance magazine to accompany a story about how most children’s books and libraries lack a diverse perspective. AD Valerie Downes.

(via libraryadvocates)

azspot:


On Reaganolatry

azspot:

On Reaganolatry


5 Ways Cloud Computing is Changing How We Do Businessbusinessreviewusa.com
Nowhere is the cloud’s presence more appreciated than in the information-heavy, always growing corporate arena.

5 Ways Cloud Computing is Changing How We Do Business
businessreviewusa.com

Nowhere is the cloud’s presence more appreciated than in the information-heavy, always growing corporate arena.

(Source: smarterplanet)

5 Simple Office Policies That Make Danish Workers Way More Happy Than Americans -

http://www.fastcoexist.com/3029110/5-simple-office-policies-that-make-danish-workers-way-more-happy-than-americanse

Why Robocops Need to be Less Efficient Than Human Coaps -

technoccult:

Klint Finley

iRobot security robot

New from me at Wired:

Automation is also framed as a way to make law enforcement more efficient. A red light camera can catch a lot more violations than a human can.

The rub is that extreme efficiency isn’t necessarily good thing. That’s what a group…

What has Amazon beat on all-you-can-read e-books? Your public library -

willywaldo:

Though you still have to deal with due dates, hold lists and occasionally clumsy software, libraries, at least for now, have one killer feature that the others don’t: e-books you actually want to read

(via libraryjournal)

futuramb:

Capital project and infrastructure spending: Key findings: PwC
The global investment in infrastructure will almost double until 2025 - to 9 billion - so there is no doubt where the overflow of capital looking for long term investment opportunities will go?
The report also underlines the uncertainties in these numbers by referring to WEF report risks list. Interesting!

futuramb:

Capital project and infrastructure spending: Key findings: PwC

The global investment in infrastructure will almost double until 2025 - to 9 billion - so there is no doubt where the overflow of capital looking for long term investment opportunities will go?

The report also underlines the uncertainties in these numbers by referring to WEF report risks list. Interesting!